Category Archives: quilting for good

Quilts of Valor

Monday evening this came off the longarm!

Quilt of Valor longarmed by Ormond Beach Quilts

It’s for the Quilt of Valor program & will most likely to given to a local Veteran.

If you’re not familiar with the Quilts of Valor program, I high recommend checking out their website.  It’s a fantastic program that supports combat veterans & those who were touched by war.

Quilt of Valor longarmed by Ormond Beach Quilts

It was pieced by Anna D. & she used the Disappearing 9-Patch pattern.  This is a great pattern for scraps & works up quickly!

Quilt of Valor longarmed by Ormond Beach Quilts

I used a new pantograph, Zebra by Hermoine Agee- it reminds me of the flag waving in the breeze.

Zebra by Hermoine Agee, 8"

For the backing Anna used the 10″ square method.  I’ve never used a backing like this before & I was quite impressed by how easily it worked.  It’s also nice because it guarantees the longarmer to have enough extra fabric.  We need the extra room in a backing in order to pin it to our leaders (that’s how we get the quilts on the frame) & for our clamps to hold the sides to prevents puckers.

Quilt of Valor longarmed by Ormond Beach Quilts

It was a joy to quilt & I can’t wait to longarm Anna’s next quilt!  The recipient is sure to love this quilt.

Raindrops for do.good stitches

Hey there!

Just a quick post to show you a project I just contributed to.

I recently was invited to join a do.good stitches group (I was on the waiting list for a few months & didn’t expect to get the invite in the middle of the Foster Teen project, but it’s all good!)  I’m now part of the BELIEVE circle which makes quilts for kids in the foster system.  (see a trend here, I swear I was randomly picked for this circle, I did nothing to influence it, but it does make one wonder….)

It’s a monthly bee where someone posts directions & guidelines & everyone submits a block or two by the end of the month.

This month we were instructed to improv piece at least 4 raindrops.

raindrops for do.good stitches

(Another bad photo, I know you’re shocked!)

I can’t wait to see what the end result looks like!

Bloggers’ Quilt Festival, Spring 2015

It’s time for the Bloggers’ Quilt Festival again!

This year I’m submitting a special quilt that’s part of a larger project I’m working on. This is one of seven quilts I’m making with my Mom’s group for graduating foster teens in the City of Alexandria.

String Quilts for Foster Teens
These teens leave the foster system only with the items given to them by a proactive community member who works tirelessly on their behalf.

String Quilts for Foster Teens

Nationwide 1/3 of them do not have a high school diploma
.

Due to limited work histories, many find it difficult to obtain employment.  Those who do typically work in positions where they can easily be exploited or find it difficult to increase their independence.

One day they are considered a child by the state, and the next day they are on their own responsible for everything.

String Quilts for Foster Teens
I was drawn to help these teens and I was thrilled when my mom’s group wanted to help!  We are sewing string blocks during nap times, in the evenings, anytime we can grab a few minutes together.  These women have newborns & twins, but all of us have babies under two.  Once or twice a week we get together at my house & we work while the babies play (ok, & sometimes we play more than work!)  I love this project because the string quilts don’t require advanced quilting skills & there’s plenty of work for non-sewers to do!  In fact, we can assembly line these blocks easily where one person sews & another presses.

String Quilts for Foster Teens
It means a lot to me that these teens receive the quilts.  I worked with foster kids at the Boys & Girls Club of Alaska & this is what I know about them:
– These are the easily forgotten.
– They are talented at making themselves invisible.
– They have had their hearts broken numerous times.
– They are beautiful lives that deserve to be made whole again.

These quilts for them.  To give them something that will keep them warm- no matter where they are sleeping.  To give them something from moms in their community to let them know they are cared about.  To give them a reminder that someone has not forgotten about them.

DSCN0952
If you’re interested in how to make a difference for foster teens graduating out of your local area- the Jim Casey Youth Opportunities Initiative can help you!

Linking up with the Bloggers’ Quilt Festival at Amy’s Creative Side

Blogger's Quilt Festival

Quilting Highlights: Simple 9-Patch

This is another quilt I longarmed for Quilts from the Bluffs.  Isn’t it the most darling little quilt?

9-Patch quilt for Quilts From the Bluffs quilted by Ormond Beach Quilts
I love the design & balance of this quilt.

Design:
The 9-patches are bold & distinctively stand out in the quilt.  And by adding in the skinny teal inner border they gave the quilt a nice “pop”.  Now your eye isn’t getting bored with looking at pink & brown.

Balance:
The complementary print fabric adds texture and subtlety- see how it appears to hang out in the background & doesn’t overpower the 9-patches?  This is a great use of a print fabric!
Then the added brown cornerstones in the outside border then create a sense of continuity.

9-Patch quilt for Quilts From the Bluffs quilted by Ormond Beach Quilts
Quilting:
For the quilting I chose the pattern “Jilly” by Keryn Emmerson because the round design worked with the flowers in the print while at the same time the center of the swirls gives some dimension to the quilt.

Jilly by Keryn Emmerson, 6"

This quilt is one of the best examples of traditional quilt design I’ve seen recently.  I hope this quilt is kept a little girl warm this chilly winter!

Quilting Highlights: Blue & Cream Charity Quilt

I was going through old pictures & couldn’t believe I never shared this beautiful quilt with ya’ll!

Baptist Fan quilting for Quilts from the Bluffs by Ormond Beach Quilts
This was a donation quilt for Quilts from the Bluffs a few years ago, pieced by one of their members & that I quilted.

Since the fabrics reminded me of a reproduction look, I wanted to use a classic quilting pattern to bring justice to the quilt.  The Baptist Fan pattern was the perfect choice!

Baptist Fan quilting for Quilts from the Bluffs by Ormond Beach Quilts
I love how it adds a nice subtle background texture, yet doesn’t distract from the overall design.  In fact, the clam shells help add an element of movement that works with the diagonal stripes.

Continuous Baptist Fans by Hermione Agee, 5″
The Baptist Fan pattern is one of my all time favorites- it’s classic, simple & elegant.  What more could we ask from a design?

Random Thoughts on Tuesday

  • We’re all moved into our new home!  (well mostly, you know, there are always things to be done…)
  • I have a studio again, & it’s wonderful to be able to work in a good usable space.
  • I have (almost) mastered quilting in one hour bursts.
  • I’ve been piecing string blocks since they require little thought & can easily be picked up/put down.
  • It is a fact that no mater how many string blocks you piece, your stash of strips will never decrease.  I have pieced 20+ blocks & still have two shoe boxes full of strings.
  • Teapot is ten months old today!
  • I found this Piece of Cake dress from Anna Maria Horner that I *need* to make for her. (& while you’re looking at that picture, scroll on down to the Paper Fan Dress!  Adorable!)
  • I finished two UFOs in February!  Once the weather isn’t so glum, I’ll take some pictures outside.
  • I’ve been quilting beautiful cross stitched & embroidered quilts for customers!  Seriously, my clients give me the most amazing pieces to quilt.

Happy Tuesday everyone!  (& if you’re in the path of another snow storm or winter weather- stay warm & safe!)

Civil War Quilt

I recently got a new laptop & so I’ve been going through files & came across a trove of pictures of quilts I’ve longarmed that never made it onto the blog.  So over the next few weeks I’ll be highlighting some of these great quilts I’ve worked on for customers & charities.

Civil War Quilt longarmed by Ormond Beach Quilts

Today’s quilt is a great civil war reproduction quilt my customer made for an auction at the Micah House in Council Bluffs, Iowa.

Civil War Quilt longarmed by Ormond Beach Quilts

She chose the Arabesque panto & it was the perfect choice!   Arabesque is a fairly dense small scale design which complemented the small blocks beautifully.

Arabesque by Patricia Ritter, 9″

It was impeccably pieced and a joy to quilt!

I hope whomever won this quilt is enjoying the talents of this piecer!

Gingham Baby Quilt

I recently finished this gingham baby quilt in order to practice a new quilting design: Easy Orange Peel.  The end result blew me away!

Gingham Baby Quilt by Ormond Beach Quilts

This was a baby quilt I pieced back in junior high for the AIDS Baby Quilt Drive, the first of my quilting for charity.  (Does anyone remember that crisis?  It was the early 90s & I remember learning about the babies dying from AIDS complications at my LQS & pestering my mom that I needed to make quilts for them.  It still gives me upsets me to think of those poor babies.)

Gingham Baby Quilt by Ormond Beach Quilts

I made a lot of quilts for the babies, but somehow this one never got quilted.  (hmmm, seems to be a trend with me….)  I was digging around the studio for a quilt that would take the Easy Orange Peel design well & came across this one.

Gingham Baby Quilt by Ormond Beach Quilts

What I can’t believe is how striking the quilting design made this quilt!  I mean, look at the quilt- there’s nothing special here, just squares arranged in a diagonal pattern.  And gingham squares at that!  But the quilting just makes the whole quilt look all snuggly & precious, like you can’t wait to find a baby & wrap her up in it!

Gingham Baby Quilt by Ormond Beach Quilts

But Teapot doesn’t need another quilt.  Really.  She doesn’t.  And I did piece this with the purpose of donating it, so I’ll bring it to the next guild meeting & see if we can’t find a good home for the quilt.

Tuesday Tip: String Quilts, Part 2

Here’s Part 2 of the String Quilt Tutorial!  (Part 1 is over here.) Do you have your blocks ready to be trimmed?

We are going to trim the 7″ blocks down to 6 1/2″ & the 13″ down to 12 1/2″.  That way you can combine the blocks for a great scrappy quilt!

The example I will show you here is for the 7″ blocks- but the same theory will hold for the 13″ blocks.

Start with turning your string block upside down, with the strings going from the top right corner to the bottom left corner (that is if you’re right handed):

Now we are going to setup our ruler for trimming.  Right handed quilters will want to first trim the square on the right side & top.  Place a square ruler (my favorite is the 9 1/2″ square by either Omnigrid or Creative Grids), on top of the muslin foundation with the numbers starting a 0 in the top right corner.  Make sure the muslin base extends far enough to the left & bottom to pass the 6 1/2″ mark:

Go ahead & with your rotary cutter, cut the right side & top.  Remember to always cut away from yourself.  Your block should now look like this:

Next you will take the ruler off so you can rotate your block to trim the other two sides.  Take the newly trimmed corner & place it so that it is now in the bottom left corner.  Place your ruler on top of the block & now you will align the 6 1/2″ markings to the left & bottom sides.  You should have muslin extending from the top & right of the ruler:

Now go ahead & now trim the right & top sides:

Congratulations!  You have a completed string block!

To get an idea of what they look like together, here’s a pic of a string quilt I quilted last year for Quilts from the Bluffs.  I love the scrappy goodness:

Lastly, please consider making some of these blocks for Quilts from the Bluffs: Children’s Square String Block Collection.  These blocks will be made into quilts that children will given immediately upon entering their new temporary home at Children’s Square.  Our members have seen firsthand what receiving a quilt can do to these children’s spirits- join Quilts from the Bluffs as we work to help enwrap these children in love.

Hearts a Flutter Longarm Quilting Designs


Some of the quilting designs I use just make me so happy!  This pattern is called “Hearts a Flutter,” by Lisa Calle & it looks beautiful on quilts! 

I love the movement, the flowy hearts, the curls- it’s a great design for feminine quilts that isn’t too formal.

(Also, here’s the front, just a simple panel quilt, but the pattern makes it lovely!  This is for Quilts from the Bluffs.)