Tag Archives: scrap quilts

Anna’s Quilt of Valor

Good morning!

Here’s another Quilt of Valor for you! (and before you say anything, yes, I’ve been quilting lots of Quilts of Valor lately- July must have inspired everyone to support such a wonderful program!)

Anna's Quilt of Valor longarmed by Ormond Beach Quilts

This was another top I received from Anna.  You may remember her quilts here & here.

Anna's Quilt of Valor longarmed by Ormond Beach Quilts

It’s another beautiful scrap quilt & because I noticed there were quite a few floral fabrics, I was inspired to use my Ambrosia quilting design.

Ambrosia by Patricia Ritter, 7.25"

Since becoming involved with Quilts of Valor, I’ve started to notice them everywhere.  Which makes me wonder, have you make a Quilt of Valor?  Would you be interested if I designed a free pattern to support their cause?

 

 

Sister’s Choice Quilt of Valor

The Sister’s Choice Quilters up in Falls Church gave me several Quilts of Valor in July!

This one was pieced by Anna & it may look familiar to you- remember this quilt?  I love the simplicity of the design & how it’s a wonderful scrappy pattern.

Quilt of Valor longarmed by Ormond Beach Quilts

I decided to use the Seaweed panto to add movement to the quilt.

Quilt of Valor longarmed by Ormond Beach Quilts

Seaweed

Seaweed

It’s been a great pleasure to work with these ladies on these quilts!  I hope I have the privilege of quilting for them often.

Bloggers’ Quilt Festival, Spring 2015

It’s time for the Bloggers’ Quilt Festival again!

This year I’m submitting a special quilt that’s part of a larger project I’m working on. This is one of seven quilts I’m making with my Mom’s group for graduating foster teens in the City of Alexandria.

String Quilts for Foster Teens
These teens leave the foster system only with the items given to them by a proactive community member who works tirelessly on their behalf.

String Quilts for Foster Teens

Nationwide 1/3 of them do not have a high school diploma
.

Due to limited work histories, many find it difficult to obtain employment.  Those who do typically work in positions where they can easily be exploited or find it difficult to increase their independence.

One day they are considered a child by the state, and the next day they are on their own responsible for everything.

String Quilts for Foster Teens
I was drawn to help these teens and I was thrilled when my mom’s group wanted to help!  We are sewing string blocks during nap times, in the evenings, anytime we can grab a few minutes together.  These women have newborns & twins, but all of us have babies under two.  Once or twice a week we get together at my house & we work while the babies play (ok, & sometimes we play more than work!)  I love this project because the string quilts don’t require advanced quilting skills & there’s plenty of work for non-sewers to do!  In fact, we can assembly line these blocks easily where one person sews & another presses.

String Quilts for Foster Teens
It means a lot to me that these teens receive the quilts.  I worked with foster kids at the Boys & Girls Club of Alaska & this is what I know about them:
– These are the easily forgotten.
– They are talented at making themselves invisible.
– They have had their hearts broken numerous times.
– They are beautiful lives that deserve to be made whole again.

These quilts for them.  To give them something that will keep them warm- no matter where they are sleeping.  To give them something from moms in their community to let them know they are cared about.  To give them a reminder that someone has not forgotten about them.

DSCN0952
If you’re interested in how to make a difference for foster teens graduating out of your local area- the Jim Casey Youth Opportunities Initiative can help you!

Linking up with the Bloggers’ Quilt Festival at Amy’s Creative Side

Blogger's Quilt Festival

Scrapitude Part 3

Sandy posted part 3 of the mystery quilt this past week & I was so excited I dove in on Thursday & completed this step:

Scrapitude part 3

It went very quickly so after the piecing & pressing I went ahead & trimmed all my dog ears on these blocks as well as the triangles in part 2.

So this quilt is put away for a while now & I’m working on other projects in the meantime.  Some baby things, some Block of the Month things & also just figuring out where I am on several projects.

Happy sewing!

 

Tuesday Tip!: The Stay Stitch

 

This cute little quilt top was a mystery I did with Stitchin’ Tree Quilts in Harlan, Iowa at a retreat back in January.  It’s a great scrap quilt & a fun play with color value.  Since my neutral was more of a medium color, I chose dark scraps for my piecing- but what, this isn’t a post about color theory- let me get onto the Tuesday Tip!

See how the outside border is pieced with all the different squares? Here’s a close up:

Notice how those seams that piece the border together run off the quilt? This can lead the stitching on the outside edge to become loose:

See how loose those seams are? And that’s just from folding & unfolding the quilt top! To keep those seams secure, we can sew a “stay stitch” around the outside edge of the quilt to keep them in place.

This is how I do it:  I simply sew around the edge of the quilt, 1/8″ from the outside edge.  Here it is in more detail:

I first get my “regular sewing foot.” This is the foot I use when constructing clothes or appliqueing. Basically it’s the foot I use when I’m not piecing a quilt. Now my foot has an 1/8″ marking on it. See where my needle is? Look just to the right of that- see that red line? That’s my 1/8″ line. I line up my fabric to that guide & start sewing as normal.

Now for thread, I don’t usually care what color I use for this technique- I just use whatever because since I’m stitching at 1/8″ from the edge & I usually sew my binding on at 1/4″ or 3/8″, it will be hidden in the binding. Here’s I’ve used a dark blue thread. So I continue sewing down the edge of the quilt side, until I get to the end, here I just stitch of the quilt:

Then I turn the quilt top & start the next side from the top:

My corner ends up looking nice & crisp like this:

You may be wondering why I bother sewing to the end, cutting my thread & rotating the quilt & starting again on each side- I do this because I get a crisper corner with my sewing machine. I found if I turned the corner, the corner ended up smaller & not as nice & even something crooked with my sewing machine. So in the end do what works for you- for me, I like the method that may take a little longer & use a little more thread, but I prefer it for the nicer finish. Thank you for joining me again for the Tuesday Tip! The stay stitch makes for a much nicer top to give your longarmer when you have a pieced border or a quilt that has curved edges (like in a Double Wedding Ring.) I hope to see you next week!

Quilts From the Bluffs

I recently got in touch with Jeanine who leads Quilts From the Bluffs, a quilting ministry out of Council Bluffs.She was in need of a longarmer for their many quilts tops pieced by their prolific piecers & with the new machine I needed practice tops.She eagerly gave me 10 tops to work on at our first meeting & this is one of them:

I quilted a wave through every string (no matter how wide or narrow) with King Tut thread.  Incidently, this was also the first quilt I completed on the new longarm back in August- it was so much fun playing with the new machine!